Friday, October 03, 2003

SEEN ON A MILK CARTON
So I was having cereal this morning when I noticed something strange on the milk carton. MISSING, blared the title, with a picture of two warheads labeled "mustard gas" and another labelled "anthrax." These twins read the caption are responsible for provoking one of the most controversial wars in decades. But they have been missing ever since social services was sent in to find them in early 2003. If found, please contact G.W. Bush, White House, Washington DC immediately.

Well, the United States has spent $300 million trying to find the ephemeral weapons of mass destruction in Iraq but to no avail. Britain's The Independent reported that "Five months after the end of the war in Iraq, a CIA adviser has admitted that his 1,200-strong team of inspectors has discovered none of Saddam Hussein's alleged weapons of mass destruction."

If this ends up being the final result, it leaves the White House's already battered credibility in tatters. Countering Saddam's weapons of mass destruction was the main (public) justification for going to war. It was the basis on which most Americans supported the invasion and conquest of Iraq. Sure, getting rid of an evil dictator was a nice side benefit but that, alone, was hardly worth sacrificing American lives, according to most citizens.

Without the weapons of mass destruction argument, Saddam was "merely" a sadistic bastard like a dozen other sadistic bastards around the world. He certainly merited being overthrown (at the very least), but most Americans would never have supported a full-scale invasion to achieve that sole end. That's why the administration concocted the dubious argument that Saddam was a direct threat to Americans in America. They gambled, correctly, Americans WOULD support an invasion if facts were manipulated to seem like such an operation were in self-defense.

While considered how much energy and money has been spent on the mythical Iraq threat, I noted another headline from The Independent: North Korea has the capability to make six nuclear bombs.

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